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Meet Kam Warner

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Office: (419)874 7958
Cell: 419-345-5170
Fax: (419)874-9682
VM:
kamwarner@wellesbowen.com
 MEET KAM WARNER

Professional and Personal Qualifications

    • Toledo Board of Realtors®
    • Ohio Association of Realtors®
    • National Association of Realtors®
    2012,2013, 2014 Toledo Board of Realtors President’s Club Member
    Voted 2011 Best Realtor of the Year by the Toledo City Paper
    • Consistent Top Producer for Welles Bowen Realtors
    • Award of Achievement, Ohio Association of Realtors 2013
    • Award of Distinction, Ohio Association of Realtors, 2014
    • Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Bowling Green State University
    • Member of Ft. Meigs YMCA **Member Perrysburg Chamber of Commerce
    • Member of the Toledo Zoo • Specialize in residential real estate sales
    • Former career in Marketing and Public Relations
    • Perrysburg resident
    • Interests are rehabbing properties and spending quality time with my family
    • Free – without obligation or cost – consultation!

 

Serving Clients in Northwest Ohio

What are you waiting for?

Let’s get movin! Isn’t that one of the first phrases used upon deciding to venture into the real estate market? Whether you are ready to buy, sell or invest, I am here to help you realize your property goals. My proven background in marketing and my passion for real estate make me an excellent candidate to be your agent. My written guarantee to you is to communicate continuously throughout the real estate process so you are kept informed. I pride myself on turning many clients into extended family, as our relationship should be longstanding – not one that exists only for the duration of a transaction. To find out more about me and sales style opt to follow me on these social media sites that I actively participate – Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and LinkedIn.

 

Featured Agent – Roula Manton

About Roula Manton
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Office:419-535-0011
Cell: 419-410-4208
Fax: 419 535-7571
VM: 419-539-2700 ext. 134
roulamanton@wellesbowen.com

Professional and Personal Qualifications

  • Lifetime Member TBR Million Dollar Club
  • Professional Designations, ABR, CRS
  • OAR President’s Sales Club
  • Licensed Realtor® for 29 years
  • Relocation Specialist
  • Member of The Leading Real Estate Companies of the World™
  • Specializing in Metro Toledo, Sylvania, Perrysburg, Maumee, Ottawa Hills
  • Native of Greece/Bilingual
  • Member of Greek Orthodox Cathedral
  • Member of International Institute
  • Member of Botanical Gardens
  • Member of the Toledo Board of Realtors®
  • Ohio Association od Realtors®
  • National Association of Realtors®
  • Member of the Toledo Zoo

 

My Mission

I will work for you Full-Time, as a Real Estate Professional, to assist you in purchasing a home or to sell your home for the highest price in the least amount of time, using my expertise to make this a smooth and pleasant transaction.

 

Nathan and Carrie Kerber Shared This Article

How to Assess the Real Cost of a Fixer-Upper House

By: G. M. Filisko Published: August 24, 2010
When you buy a fixer-upper house, you can save a ton of money, or get yourself in a financial fix.
Trying to decide whether to buy a fixer-upper house? Follow these seven steps, and you’ll know how much you can afford, how much to offer, and whether a fixer-upper house is right for you.
1. Decide what you can do yourself
TV remodeling shows make home improvement work look like a snap. In the real world, attempting a difficult remodeling job that you don’t know how to do will take longer than you think and can lead to less-than-professional results that won’t increase the value of your fixer-upper house.
Do you really have the skills to do it? Some tasks, like stripping wallpaper and painting, are relatively easy. Others, like electrical work, can be dangerous when done by amateurs.
Do you really have the time and desire to do it? Can you take time off work to renovate your fixer-upper house? If not, will you be stressed out by living in a work zone for months while you complete projects on the weekends?
2. Price the cost of repairs and remodeling before you make an offer
Get your contractor into the house to do a walk-through, so he can give you a written cost estimate on the tasks he’s going to do.
If you’re doing the work yourself, price the supplies.
Either way, tack on 10% to 20% to cover unforeseen problems that often arise with a fixer-upper house.
3. Check permit costs
Ask local officials if the work you’re going to do requires a permit and how much that permit costs. Doing work without a permit may save money, but it’ll cause problems when you resell your home.
Decide if you want to get the permits yourself or have the contractor arrange for them. Getting permits can be time-consuming and frustrating. Inspectors may force you to do additional work, or change the way you want to do a project, before they give you the permit.
Factor the time and aggravation of permits into your plans.
4. Doublecheck pricing on structural work
If your fixer-upper home needs major structural work, hire a structural engineer for $500 to $700 to inspect the home before you put in an offer so you can be confident you’ve uncovered and conservatively budgeted for the full extent of the problems.

Get written estimates for repairs before you commit to buying a home with structural issues.

Don’t purchase a home that needs major structural work unless:
You’re getting it at a steep discount
You’re sure you’ve uncovered the extent of the problem
You know the problem can be fixed
You have a binding written estimate for the repairs
5. Check the cost of financing
Be sure you have enough money for a downpayment, closing costs, and repairs without draining your savings.

If you’re planning to fund the repairs with a home equity or home improvement loan:
Get yourself pre-approved for both loans before you make an offer.
Make the deal contingent on getting both the purchase money loan and the renovation money loan, so you’re not forced to close the sale when you have no loan to fix the house.
Consider the Federal Housing Administration’s Section 203(k) program, which is designed to help home owners who are purchasing or refinancing a home that needs rehabilitation. The program wraps the purchase/refinance and rehabilitation costs into a single mortgage. To qualify for the loan, the total value of the property must fall within the FHA mortgage limit for your area, as with other FHA loans. A streamlined 203(k) program provides an additional amount for rehabilitation, up to $35,000, on top of an existing mortgage. It’s a simpler process than obtaining the standard 203(k).
6. Calculate your fair purchase offer
Take the fair market value of the property (what it would be worth if it were in good condition and remodeled to current tastes) and subtract the upgrade and repair costs.
For example: Your target fixer-upper house has a 1960s kitchen, metallic wallpaper, shag carpet, and high levels of radon in the basement.

Your comparison house, in the same subdivision, sold last month for $200,000. That house had a newer kitchen, no wallpaper, was recently recarpeted, and has a radon mitigation system in its basement.
The cost to remodel the kitchen, remove the wallpaper, carpet the house, and put in a radon mitigation system is $40,000. Your bid for the house should be $160,000.
Ask your real estate agent if it’s a good idea to share your cost estimates with the sellers, to prove your offer is fair.
7. Include inspection contingencies in your offer
Don’t rely on your friends or your contractor to eyeball your fixer-upper house. Hire pros to do common inspections like:
Home inspection. This is key in a fixer-upper assessment. The home inspector will uncover hidden issues in need of replacement or repair. You may know you want to replace those 1970s kitchen cabinets, but the home inspector has a meter that will detect the water leak behind them.
Radon, mold, lead-based paint
Septic and well
Pest
Most home inspection contingencies let you go back to the sellers and ask them to do the repairs, or give you cash at closing to pay for the repairs. The seller can also opt to simply back out of the deal, as can you, if the inspection turns up something you don’t want to deal with.

G.M. Filisko is an attorney and award-winning writer whose parents bought and renovated a fixer-upper when she was a teen. A regular contributor to many national publications including Bankrate.com, REALTOR® Magazine, and the American Bar Association Journal, she specializes in real estate, business, personal finance, and legal topics.

ABOUT THE KERBERS
kerbers
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Office: (419)874 7958
Cell: 419-410-3856
Fax: (419)874 9682
VM:
carriekerber@wellesbowen.com

Professional and Personal Qualifications

  • Toledo Board of Realtors
  • Ohio Association of Realtors
  • Specialize in Residential Real Estate Sales
  • Satisfaction Guaranteed!
  • Service Guaranteed in Writing
  • Free Complementary Consultation
  • Member of The Leading Real Estate Companies of the World™

 

My Pledge To You….

I will act on your behalf to see that you get the best price and terms on your Real Estate transaction. I will maintain constant contact with you so that you are well informed throughout the transaction. I promise you excellent service with a written guarantee!

Featured Agent Fred Krueckeberg Shared Article About How Much Mortgage You Can Afford

Can I afford a mortgage4 Tips to Determine How Much Mortgage You Can Afford

By: G. M. Filisko

Published: March 11, 2010

By knowing how much mortgage you can handle, you can ensure that home ownership will fit in your budget.

1. The general rule of mortgage affordability

As a rule of thumb, you can typically afford a home priced two to three times your gross income. If you earn $100,000, you can typically afford a home between $200,000 and $300,000.

To understand how that rule applies to your particular financial situation, prepare a family budget and list all the costs of homeownership, like property taxes, insurance, maintenance, utilities, and community association fees, if applicable, as well as costs specific to your family, such as day care costs.

2. Factor in your downpayment

How much money do you have for a downpayment? The higher your downpayment, the lower your monthly payments will be. If you put down at least 20% of the home’s cost, you may not have to get private mortgage insurance, which costs hundreds each month. That leaves more money for your mortgage payment.

The lower your downpayment, the higher the loan amount you’ll need to qualify for and the higher your monthly mortgage payment.

3. Consider your overall debt

Lenders generally follow the 28/41 rule. Your monthly mortgage payments covering your home loan principal, interest, taxes, and insurance shouldn’t total more than 28% of your gross annual income. Your overall monthly payments for your mortgage plus all your other bills, like car loans, utilities, and credit cards, shouldn’t exceed 41% of your gross annual income.

Here’s how that works. If your gross annual income is $100,000, multiply by 28% and then divide by 12 months to arrive at a monthly mortgage payment of $2,333 or less. Next, check the total of all your monthly bills including your potential mortgage and make sure they don’t top 41%, or $3,416 in our example.

4. Use your rent as a mortgage guide

The tax benefits of homeownership generally allow you to afford a mortgage payment—including taxes and insurance—of about one-third more than your current rent payment without changing your lifestyle. So you can multiply your current rent by 1.33 to arrive at a rough estimate of a mortgage payment.

Here’s an example. If you currently pay $1,500 per month in rent, you should be able to comfortably afford a $2,000 monthly mortgage payment after factoring in the tax benefits of homeownership.

However, if you’re struggling to keep up with your rent, consider what amount would be comfortable and use that for the calcuation instead.

Also consider whether or not you’ll itemize your deductions. If you take the standard deduction, you can’t also deduct mortgage interest payments. Talking to a tax adviser, or using a tax software program to do a “what if” tax return, can help you see your tax situation more clearly.

G.M. Filisko is an attorney and award-winning writer who’s owned her own home for more than 20 years. A frequent contributor to many national publications including Bankrate.com, REALTOR® Magazine, and the American Bar Association Journal, she specializes in real estate, business, personal finance, and legal topics.

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Office: 419-891-0888
Cell: 419-290-5240
Fax: 419 891-1092
VM: 419-897-2700 x 278
fredkrueckeberg@wellesbowen.com

Trudy Wachtmann Presents 6 Things Everyone Should Do When Moving Into a New House

By: Courtney Craig Published: October 1, 2012

Moving into your first home is exciting! But it also means you’ve got work to do.

When I bought my first house in May, my timing couldn’t have been better: The house closing was two weeks before the lease was up on my apartment. That meant I could take my time packing and moving, and I could get to know the new place before moving in.

I recruited family and friends to help me move (in exchange for a beer-and-pizza picnic on the floor) and, as a bonus, I got to pick their brains about what first-time home owners should know.

Their help was one of the best housewarming presents I could have gotten. And thanks to their expertise and a little Googling, here’s what I learned about what to do before moving in.

1. Change the locks. You really don’t know who else has keys to your home, so change the locks. That ensures you’re the only person who has access. Install new deadbolts yourself for as little as $10 per lock, or call a locksmith — if you supply the new locks, they typically charge about $20-$30 per lock for labor.

2. Check for plumbing leaks. Your home inspector should do this for you before closing, but it never hurts to double-check. I didn’t have any leaks to fix, but when checking my kitchen sink, I did discover the sink sprayer was broken. I replaced it for under $20.

Keep an eye out for dripping faucets and running toilets, and check your water heater for signs of a leak.

Here’s a neat trick: Check your water meter at the beginning and end of a 2-hour window in which no water is being used in your house. If the reading is different, you have a leak.

3. Steam clean carpets. Do this before you move your furniture in, and your new home life will be off to a fresh, clean start. You can pay a professional carpet cleaning service — you’ll pay about $50 per room; most services require a minimum of about $100 before they’ll come out — or you can rent a steam cleaner for about $30 per day and do the work yourself. I was able to save some money by borrowing a steam cleaner from a friend.

4. Wipe out your cabinets. Another no-brainer before you move in your dishes and bathroom supplies. Make sure to wipe inside and out, preferably with a non-toxic cleaner, and replace contact paper if necessary.

When I cleaned my kitchen cabinets, I found an unpleasant surprise: Mouse poop. Which leads me to my next tip …

5. Give critters the heave-ho. That includes mice, rats, bats, termites, roaches, and any other uninvited guests. There are any number of DIY ways to get rid of pests, but if you need to bring out the big guns, an initial visit from a pest removal service will run you $100-$300, followed by monthly or quarterly visits at about $50 each time.

For my mousy enemies, I strategically placed poison packets around the kitchen, and I haven’t found any carcasses or any more poop, so the droppings I found must have been old. I might owe a debt of gratitude to the snake that lives under my back deck, but I prefer not to think about him.

6. Introduce yourself to your circuit breaker box and main water valve. My first experience with electrical wiring was replacing a broken light fixture in a bathroom. After locating the breaker box, which is in my garage, I turned off the power to that bathroom so I wouldn’t electrocute myself.

It’s a good idea to figure out which fuses control what parts of your house and label them accordingly. This will take two people: One to stand in the room where the power is supposed to go off, the other to trip the fuses and yell, “Did that work? How about now?”

You’ll want to know how to turn off your main water valve if you have a plumbing emergency, if a hurricane or tornado is headed your way, or if you’re going out of town. Just locate the valve — it could be inside or outside your house — and turn the knob until it’s off. Test it by turning on any faucet in the house; no water should come out.

What were the first maintenance projects you did when you moved into your first home?

Trudy Wachtmann

Office: 419-592-7653
Cell: 419-966-4920
Fax: 419 592-7021
trudywachtmann@wellesbowen.com

Visit Trudy’s website by clicking HERE

Negotiate Your Best House Buy-brought to you by Deon Davis

Article From BuyAndSell.HouseLogic.com

By: G. M. Filisko Published: June 04, 2010

Keep your emotions in check and your eyes on the goal, and you’ll pay less when purchasing a home.

Buying a home can be emotional, but negotiating the price shouldn’t be. The key to saving money when purchasing a home is sticking to a plan during the turbulence of high-stakes negotiations. A real estate agent who represents you can guide you and offer you advice, but you are the one who must make the final decision during each round of offers and counter offers.

Here are six tips for negotiating the best price on a home.

1. Get prequalified for a mortgage

Getting prequalified for a mortgage proves to sellers that you’re serious about buying and capable of affording their home. That will push you to the head of the pack when sellers choose among offers; they’ll go with buyers who are a sure financial bet, not those whose financing could flop.

2. Ask questions

Ask your agent for information to help you understand the sellers’ financial position and motivation. Are they facing foreclosure or a short sale? Have they already purchased a home or relocated, which may make them eager to accept a lower price to avoid paying two mortgages? Has the home been on the market for a long time, or was it just listed? Have there been other offers? If so, why did they fall through? The more signs that sellers are eager to sell, the lower your offer can reasonably go.

3. Work back from a final price to determine your initial offer

Know in advance the most you’re willing to pay, and with your agent work back from that number to determine your initial offer, which can set the tone for the entire negotiation. A too-low bid may offend sellers emotionally invested in the sales price; a too-high bid may lead you to spend more than necessary to close the sale.

Work with your agent to evaluate the sellers’ motivation and comparable home sales to arrive at an initial offer that engages the sellers yet keeps money in your wallet.

4. Avoid contingencies

Sellers favor offers that leave little to chance. Keep your bid free of complicated contingencies, such as making the purchase conditional on the sale of your current home. Do keep contingencies for mortgage approval, home inspection, and environmental checks typical in your area, like radon.

5. Remain unemotional

Buying a home is a business transaction, and treating it that way helps you save money. Consider any movement by the sellers, however slight, a sign of interest, and keep negotiating.

Each time you make a concession, ask for one in return. If the sellers ask you to boost your price, ask them to contribute to closing costs or pay for a home warranty. If sellers won’t budge, make it clear you’re willing to walk away; they may get nervous and accept your offer.

6. Don’t let competition change your plan

Great homes and those competitively priced can draw multiple offers in any market. Don’t let competition propel you to go beyond your predetermined price or agree to concessions-such as waiving an inspection-that aren’t in your best interest.

More from HouseLogic

Determine how much mortgage you can afford (http://buyandsell.houselogic.com/articles/4-tips-determine-how-much-mortgage-you-can-afford/)

Keep your home purchase on track (http://buyandsell.houselogic.com/articles/keep-your-home-purchase-track/)

Plan for a stress-free home closing (http://buyandsell.houselogic.com/articles/7-steps-stress-free-home-closing/)

G.M. Filisko is an attorney and award-winning writer who has to remind herself to remain unemotional during negotiations. A frequent contributor to many national publications including Bankrate.com, REALTOR® Magazine, and the American Bar Association Journal, she specializes in real estate, business, personal finance, and legal topics.

Deon Davis, Realtor

Deon Davis, Realtor

Office: 419-535-0011
Cell: 419-810-1560
Fax: 419 535-7571
VM: 419-539-2700 ext. 167
deondavis@wellesbowen.com
Visit Deon’s website, by going to wellesbowen.deondavis.com

Sharon Johnson Shared This Article “Banks Tempt Underwater Home Owners with Cash — Would You Take It?”

A short sale might be worth more than avoiding a foreclosure on your credit report. For some, it means cold hard cash.

If your lender offered you as much as five figures to move out of your home because you couldn’t make your mortgage payment, would you do it or wait for the lender to foreclose?

The answer would seem to be a resounding “hell, yes.” But many people sit tight.

When Bank of America offered short-sale incentives of $5,000 to $20,000 to 20,000 Florida home owners late last year, only 3,000 home owners expressed an interest in participating.

One reason? Folks can often live rent-free while the foreclosure process winds its way through the red tape.

But, a cash “bonus” paired with a short sale that lets you avoid a foreclosure on your credit history can be a sweet deal.

An incentive payment might be as little as $3,000 via the federal government’s Home Affordable Foreclosure Alternatives program. But private lender programs offer 10 times that much, depending on where you live, which short sale program you use, and which company holds your mortgage, says BusinessWeek.

“Banks are nudging potential sellers by pre-approving deals, streamlining the closing process, forgoing their right to pursue unpaid debt, and in some cases providing large cash incentives,” Moody’s Senior Credit Officer Bill Fricke told the magazine.

Of course, incentives have their catches. You have to:

1. Help the bank sell your home. In a short sale, you find someone willing to buy your home for less than what you owe on the mortgage and your lender agrees to take the sale price.

2. Move on without a fight.

3. Probably live in a state where it takes years, rather than months, for the bank to foreclose. In those areas, it’s cheaper for the bank to pay you to do a short sale than to pay the cost of a multi-year-long foreclosure.

If you bank makes an offer and you bite, these four steps will ensure the smoothest possible process:

1. Make sure the lender can’t come after you later to collect any shortfall between what you owe on the mortgage and what you’re selling your home for. Some, but not all, states prohibit that.

2. Talk to an attorney and a tax adviser so you know what will happen financially after the short sale. If you sell now through the end of 2012, the tax rules for short sales say you won’t owe any income tax on $1 million (singles) to $2 million in forgiven mortgage debt (married couples). Those tax rules, part of the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act, expire at the end of this year and only apply to your primary residence.

3. Hire a REALTOR® experienced in short sales to handle the transaction. Look for an agent who’s earned the SFR (short sales and foreclosure resource) designation.

4. Figure out where you’re going to move and sign a lease now because your credit score will likely drop if you stop paying your mortgage and short sell your home. A low credit score can make it difficult to get a rental home.

By the way, you can ask your bank if it’s willing to work with you on a short sale, but asking for an incentive too? That’s not how it works. Banks choose you for an incentive program, and how they decide isn’t clear, though they’re less likely to offer cash in states where it only takes a couple of months to foreclose.

So would you take the cash and short sale, or hold out?
By: Dona DeZube Published: February 17, 2012

Sharon Johnson, Realtor


Office: 419-891-0888
Cell: 419-260-1752
Fax: 419 891-1092
VM: 419-897-2700 ext. 240
sharonjohnson@wellesbowen.com

You can find Sharon’s website by clicking here.

Featured Agents – The Perry Team Tour Perrysburg Ohio

The Perry Team, Jill and Mark Perry take you on a video tour of local gem Historic Perrysburg Ohio.

Jill and Mark Perry

You can find Jill and Mark’s website by clicking here.

ABOUT WELLES BOWEN REALTORS For over 100 years, Welles Bowen Realtors has been consistent in its ability to recruit and retain many of Toledo and NW Ohio’s top agents. While much of our agents’ success can be attributed to individual initiative, an equally large measure is due to the strength and support Welles Bowen provides. From educational opportunities to the latest in marketing technology, ...
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The IDX Data on this site was last updated on Feb 22 2015 6:00AM Eastern Standard Time. All Information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. The data is updated on a daily basis. Some properties which appear for sale on this website may subsequently have sold and may no longer be available. For the most current information, contact Welles Bowen Realtors at 1-800-533-7692 or email us at mail@wellesbowen.com. The data relating to real estate for sale on this web site comes in part from the Broker Reciprocity Program of the NORIS MLS. Real estate listings held by brokerage firms other than Welles Bowen Realtors are marked with the Broker Reciprocity logo and detailed information about them includes the name of the listing brokers. © Copyright 2015 NORIS. All rights reserved. Broker Reciprocity information is provided exclusively for consumers personal, non-commercial use and may not be used for any purpose other than to identify prospective properties consumers may be interested in purchasing.

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