Kay McArdle’s Toledo Real Estate Looking More Positive in 2013!

The real estate market in Toledo, Ohio may be looking more positive in 2013 than in other areas of the country. The National Association of Realtors’ chief economist Lawrence Yun predicted recently that home values could rise 15% and number of homes sold 20% this year. And he said the Toledo area should be leading the numbers because it has been a bit behind in the general national recovery.

Some other developments that point towards a healtier market are…

Local City of Toledo and suburban areas housing inventory is down making for more competition, multiple offers, quicker sales and putting some upward pressure on prices. We’re especially seeing some shortages of high end homes in Sylvania and Perrysburg.

We are finally seeing more 1st time buyers enter the market creating the snowball effect of helping current home owners move to other more desired homes.

Federal regulators have reached yet another agreement with 10 large banks who wronged homeowners in the foreclosure process and will make modest payments to those people. How much help this will have for the housing market is debateable. But, $5.2 million of that settlement will be available for banks to do loan modifications for people at risk of foreclosure and keeping families in their homes will certainly help the housing market.

New rules by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to take effect in 2014 are going to require that lenders only make loans that borrowers can afford. Banks and Mortgage Brokers will have to verify and inspect borrowers financial records (odd that hasn’t been regular practice) and lend only an amount that keeps the borrowers’ total debt including credit cards, student debt and car payments to 43% of their total income. And finally “interest only” loans and “no doc” loans are being banned.

There was an extension of the Mortgage Cancellation Relief through January 1, 2014 as part of the fiscal cliff deal just reached. This has to do with the amount forgiven by mortgage holders in short sales not being taxed as income to the poor people losing their homes. It is good for the housing market because short sale homes are generally in better condition and sell for more than foreclosed homes.

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cotact us

Office: 419-535-0011
Cell: 419-654-0059
Fax: 419 535-7571
VM: 419-539-2700 ext. 102
kaymcardle@wellesbowen.com

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Laura McIntyre Presents Open House Timeline: Countdown to a Successful Sale

Article From BuyAndSell.HouseLogic.com By: Dona DeZube Published: May 06, 2011

An inviting open house can put your home on buyers’ short lists.

Get ready for your open house-stress-free-by starting early and breaking down your to-do list into manageable chunks. Use this timeline of 35 tips and your house will stand out from the competition on open house day.

Four weeks before the open house

Ask your parents to babysit the kids the weekend of the open house. Then book a reservation for your pet with the dog sitter or at the kennel. Having everyone out of the house on the day of will help you keep your home tidy and smelling fresh (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/pet-odor-can-chase-away-buyers/). Plus, no dogs and no kids equal more time for last-minute prep.

Line up a contractor to take care of maintence issues your REALTOR® has asked you to fix, like leaking faucets (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/plumbing-leaks-8-smart-tips-stop-them/), sagging gutters (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/repair-sagging-and-leaking-rain-gutters-save-money/), or dings in the walls (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/repair-walls-give-rooms-fresh-face/).

De-clutter every room (even if you already de-cluttered once before). Don’t hide your stuff in the closet-buyers will open doors to size up closet space. Store your off-season clothes, sports equipment, and toys somewhere else.

Book carpet cleaners for a few days before the open house and a house cleaning service for the day before. Otherwise, make sure to leave time to do these things yourself a couple of days before.

Three weeks before the open house

Buy fluffy white towels to create a spa-like feel in the bathrooms.

Buy a front door mat to give a good first impression.

Designate a shoebox for each bathroom to stow away personal items the day of the open house.

Two weeks before the open house

Clean the light fixtures, ceiling fans, light switches, and around door knobs. A spic-and-span house (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/cleaning-house-secrets-truly-deep-clean/) makes buyers feel like they can move right in.

Power-wash the house (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/clean-and-care-siding/), deck (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/care-and-maintenance-your-deck/), sidewalk, and driveway.

One week before the open house

Make sure potential buyers can get up close and personal with your furnace, air-conditioning unit (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/appliance-maintenance-heating-venting-and-air-conditioning-hvac/), and appliances (http://www.houselogic.com/categories/maintain/structures-systems/appliances-electronics/). They’ll want to read any maintenance and manufacturer’s stickers to see how old everything is.

Clean the inside of appliances and de-clutter kitchen cabinets and drawers and the pantry. Buyers will open cabinet doors and drawers. If yours are stuffed to the gills, buyers will think your kitchen lacks enough storage space.

Put out the new door mat to break it in. It’ll look nice, but not too obviously new for the open house.

Week of the open house

Buy ready-made cookie dough and disposable aluminum cookie sheets so you don’t have to take time for clean up after baking (you can recycle the pans after use). Nothing says “home” like the smell of freshly baked cookies.

Buy a bag of apples or lemons to display in a pretty bowl.

Let your REALTOR® know if you’re running low on sales brochures explaining the features of your house.

Clean the windows (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/green-window-cleaning-makes-glass-pane-fully-clear/) to let in the most light possible.

Mow the lawn two days before the open house. Mowing the morning of the open house can peeve house hunters with allergies.

Day before the open house

Make sure your REALTOR® puts up plenty of open-house signs pointing in the right direction and located where drivers will see them. If she can’t get to it on the Friday before a Sunday open house, offer to do it yourself.

Put away yard clutter like hoses, toys, or pet water bowls.

Lay fresh logs in the fireplace.

Day of the open house

Put checkbooks, kids’ piggybanks, jewelry, prescription drugs, bank statements, and other valuables in the trunk of your car, at a neighbor’s house, or in your safe. It’s rare, but thefts do happen at open houses.

Set the dining room table for a special-occasion dinner. In the backyard, uncover the barbeque and set the patio table for a picnic to show buyers how elegantly and simply they can entertain once they move in.

Check any play equipment for spider webs or insect invasions. A kid screaming about spiders won’t endear buyers to your home.

Clean the fingerprints off the storm door. First impressions count.

Put up Post-It notes around the house to highlight great features like tilt-in windows or a recently updated appliance.

Remove shampoo, soap, toothbrushes, and other personal items from the bathtub, shower, and sinks in all the bathrooms. Store them in a shoebox under the sink. Removing personal items makes it easier for buyers to see themselves living in your house.

Stow away all kitchen countertop appliances.

One hour before the open house

Bake the ready-to-bake cookies you bought earlier this week. Put them on a nice platter for your open house guests to eat with a note that says: “Help yourself!”

Hang the new towels in the bathrooms.

Put your bowl of apples or lemons on the kitchen table or bar counter.

Pick up and put away any throw rugs, like the bath mats. They’re a trip hazard.

15 minutes before the open house

Open all the curtains and blinds and turn on the lights in the house. Buyers like bright homes.

Light fireplace logs (if it’s winter).

Didn’t get those cookies baked? Brew a pot of coffee to make the house smell inviting.

During the open house

Get out of the house and let your REALTOR® sell it! Potential buyers will be uncomfortable discussing your home if you’re loitering during the open house. Take advantage of your child- and pet-free hours by treating yourself to something you enjoy-a few extra hours at the gym, a trip to the bookstore, or a manicure.

More from HouseLogic

7 Tips for Staging Your Home (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/7-tips-staging-your-home/)

Seasonal Maintenance (http://www.houselogic.com/categories/maintain/outdoors/seasonal-maintenance/)

10 Steps to a Perfect Exterior Paint Job (http://www.houselogic.com/articles/10-steps-perfect-exterior-paint-job/)

 

Agent Photo
cotact us

Office: 419-891-0888
Cell: 419-265-7000
Fax: 419 891-1092
VM: 419-897-2700 ext. 268
lauramcintyre@wellesbowen.com

Dona DeZube has been writing about real estate for over two decades. She lives a suburban Baltimore 1970s rancher on a 3-acre lot shared with possums, raccoons, foxes, a herd of deer, and her blue-tick hound.

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Ginni Neuenschwander 6 Things Everyone Should Do When Moving Into a New House

Ginni NeueschwanderArticle From HouseLogic.com By: Courtney Craig Published: October 01, 2012

Moving into your first home is exciting! But it also means you’ve got work to do.

When I bought my first house in May, my timing couldn’t have been better: The house closing was two weeks before the lease was up on my apartment. That meant I could take my time packing and moving, and I could get to know the new place before moving in.

I recruited family and friends to help me move (in exchange for a beer-and-pizza picnic on the floor) and, as a bonus, I got to pick their brains about what first-time home owners should know.

Their help was one of the best housewarming presents I could have gotten. And thanks to their expertise and a little Googling, here’s what I learned about what to do before moving in.

1. Change the locks. You really don’t know who else has keys to your home, so change the locks. That ensures you’re the only person who has access. Install new deadbolts yourself for as little as $10 per lock, or call a locksmith – if you supply the new locks, they typically charge about $20-$30 per lock for labor.

2. Check for plumbing leaks (http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/plumbing/plumbing-leaks-8-smart-tips-stop-them/). Your home inspector should do this for you before closing, but it never hurts to double-check. I didn’t have any leaks to fix, but when checking my kitchen sink, I did discover the sink sprayer was broken. I replaced it for under $20.

Keep an eye out for dripping faucets and running toilets, and check your water heater (http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/water-heaters/water-heater-maintenance/) for signs of a leak (http://www.houselogic.com/blog/plumbing/fix-a-leak-week-2012/).

Here’s a neat trick: Check your water meter at the beginning and end of a 2-hour window in which no water is being used in your house. If the reading is different, you have a leak.

3. Steam clean carpets (http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/home-improvement/carpet-or-hardwood/). Do this before you move your furniture in, and your new home life will be off to a fresh, clean start. You can pay a professional carpet cleaning service – you’ll pay about $50 per room; most services require a minimum of about $100 before they’ll come out – or you can rent a steam cleaner for about $30 per day and do the work yourself. I was able to save some money by borrowing a steam cleaner from a friend.

4. Wipe out your cabinets. Another no-brainer before you move in your dishes and bathroom supplies. Make sure to wipe inside and out, preferably with a non-toxic cleaner (http://www.houselogic.com/green-living/green-cleaning/), and replace contact paper if necessary.

When I cleaned my kitchen cabinets (http://www.houselogic.com/home-topics/cabinets/), I found an unpleasant surprise: Mouse poop. Which leads me to my next tip …

5. Give critters the heave-ho. That includes mice, rats (http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/pest-control/Need-to-Get-Rid-of-Rats-Its-a-Community-Effort/), bats (http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/pest-control/attic-pest-removal/), termites (http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/pest-control/detect-termites-other-wood-destroying-insects/), roaches (http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/pest-control/roach-home-removal-tips/), and any other uninvited guests. There are any number of DIY ways to get rid of pests, but if you need to bring out the big guns, an initial visit from a pest removal service will run you $100-$300, followed by monthly or quarterly visits at about $50 each time.

For my mousy enemies, I strategically placed poison packets around the kitchen, and I haven’t found any carcasses or any more poop, so the droppings I found must have been old. I might owe a debt of gratitude to the snake (http://www.houselogic.com/blog/pest-control/how-help-snake-slither-out-your-house/) that lives under my back deck, but I prefer not to think about him.

6. Introduce yourself to your circuit breaker box and main water valve. My first experience with electrical wiring (http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/electrical/when-time-for-electrical-wiring-upgrade/) was replacing a broken light fixture in a bathroom. After locating the breaker box, which is in my garage, I turned off the power to that bathroom so I wouldn’t electrocute myself.

It’s a good idea to figure out which fuses control what parts of your house and label them accordingly. This will take two people: One to stand in the room where the power is supposed to go off, the other to trip the fuses and yell, “Did that work? How about now?”

You’ll want to know how to turn off your main water valve if you have a plumbing emergency, if a hurricane (http://www.houselogic.com/protect-your-home/hurricanes/) or tornado (http://www.houselogic.com/protect-your-home/tornadoes-severe-storms/) is headed your way, or if you’re going out of town. Just locate the valve – it could be inside or outside your house – and turn the knob until it’s off. Test it by turning on any faucet in the house; no water should come out.

What were the first maintenance projects you did when you moved into your first home?

Ginni Neueschwander, Realtor

www.ginnineuenschwander.wellesbowen.com

Office: 419-335-5170
Cell: 419-822-7045
Fax: 440-399-9346
ginni@wellesbowen.com

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Negotiate Your Best House Buy-brought to you by Deon Davis

Article From BuyAndSell.HouseLogic.com

By: G. M. Filisko Published: June 04, 2010

Keep your emotions in check and your eyes on the goal, and you’ll pay less when purchasing a home.

Buying a home can be emotional, but negotiating the price shouldn’t be. The key to saving money when purchasing a home is sticking to a plan during the turbulence of high-stakes negotiations. A real estate agent who represents you can guide you and offer you advice, but you are the one who must make the final decision during each round of offers and counter offers.

Here are six tips for negotiating the best price on a home.

1. Get prequalified for a mortgage

Getting prequalified for a mortgage proves to sellers that you’re serious about buying and capable of affording their home. That will push you to the head of the pack when sellers choose among offers; they’ll go with buyers who are a sure financial bet, not those whose financing could flop.

2. Ask questions

Ask your agent for information to help you understand the sellers’ financial position and motivation. Are they facing foreclosure or a short sale? Have they already purchased a home or relocated, which may make them eager to accept a lower price to avoid paying two mortgages? Has the home been on the market for a long time, or was it just listed? Have there been other offers? If so, why did they fall through? The more signs that sellers are eager to sell, the lower your offer can reasonably go.

3. Work back from a final price to determine your initial offer

Know in advance the most you’re willing to pay, and with your agent work back from that number to determine your initial offer, which can set the tone for the entire negotiation. A too-low bid may offend sellers emotionally invested in the sales price; a too-high bid may lead you to spend more than necessary to close the sale.

Work with your agent to evaluate the sellers’ motivation and comparable home sales to arrive at an initial offer that engages the sellers yet keeps money in your wallet.

4. Avoid contingencies

Sellers favor offers that leave little to chance. Keep your bid free of complicated contingencies, such as making the purchase conditional on the sale of your current home. Do keep contingencies for mortgage approval, home inspection, and environmental checks typical in your area, like radon.

5. Remain unemotional

Buying a home is a business transaction, and treating it that way helps you save money. Consider any movement by the sellers, however slight, a sign of interest, and keep negotiating.

Each time you make a concession, ask for one in return. If the sellers ask you to boost your price, ask them to contribute to closing costs or pay for a home warranty. If sellers won’t budge, make it clear you’re willing to walk away; they may get nervous and accept your offer.

6. Don’t let competition change your plan

Great homes and those competitively priced can draw multiple offers in any market. Don’t let competition propel you to go beyond your predetermined price or agree to concessions-such as waiving an inspection-that aren’t in your best interest.

More from HouseLogic

Determine how much mortgage you can afford (http://buyandsell.houselogic.com/articles/4-tips-determine-how-much-mortgage-you-can-afford/)

Keep your home purchase on track (http://buyandsell.houselogic.com/articles/keep-your-home-purchase-track/)

Plan for a stress-free home closing (http://buyandsell.houselogic.com/articles/7-steps-stress-free-home-closing/)

G.M. Filisko is an attorney and award-winning writer who has to remind herself to remain unemotional during negotiations. A frequent contributor to many national publications including Bankrate.com, REALTOR® Magazine, and the American Bar Association Journal, she specializes in real estate, business, personal finance, and legal topics.

Deon Davis, Realtor

Deon Davis, Realtor

Office: 419-535-0011
Cell: 419-810-1560
Fax: 419 535-7571
VM: 419-539-2700 ext. 167
deondavis@wellesbowen.com
Visit Deon’s website, by going to wellesbowen.deondavis.com

14 Year Old Homeowner in Florida

English: An icon from the Crystal icon theme. ...

Image via Wikipedia

This article was so uplifting to read about the initiative this young lady showed and how she turned a business (a teenager in business) into home ownership! Read the article here.

Melissa Sargent Shows You Our Perrysburg Office

We took an impromptu tour of the soon to be opening Welles Bowen Perrysburg office, currently under remodel. Join Melissa Sargent and a few Welles Bowen agents from our Maumee office as we see what’s happening in our historic new Perrysburg office. Check back here in the future for another tour of the completed Perrysburg Welles Bowen Realtors office.

No Valentines This Year? Maybe Your Home is to Blame

Affairs of the heart always are hard to fathom. But a new survey provides some insight, revealing how your home affects your love life.

If you’re an adult living with your parents, the only Valentine you probably got is from your nobody-will-ever-love-you-as-much-as-your mother. A new survey shows that only 5% of unmarried U.S. adults would prefer to date someone living with their folks.

For the sake of your love life, move out already, the Trulia survey of 1,000 adults shows.

If you’re a guy, get a house in the suburbs — 37% of women want that white picket fence. And if you’re a gal, get a snappy one-bedroom in the city — 32% of men want a city-dwelling woman.

And, to stack the odds even more in your favor, buy — don’t rent: 36% of women surveyed found home ownership a turn-on.

Did your love life pick up after you got your own place?
By: Lisa Kaplan Gordon

Published: February 14, 2012

Featured Agent Linda Collins Shared This Article- Six More Weeks of Winter?

Punxsutawney Phil predicts six more weeks of what we laughingly call winter.

Punxsutawney Phil, the world’s most famous weather-rodent, weighed in this morning and forecasts six more weeks of winter.

What’s that groundhog smoking? Many parts of the country haven’t had six weeks of real winter yet. My daffodils already are sprouting — a month ahead of Virginia’s usual spring.

On the off-chance that old Phil is correct — he’s right about 39% of the time — here are some ways you can still button up your home for six more weeks of this freaky winter with these home repair tips:

Caulk air-leaking cracks around windows and doors.

Clean or replace furnace filters.

Clear gutters of debris to prevent ice buildup.

Gas up snow blowers in case of a big storm. (Like that’s going to happen.)

If you’re still enjoying April weather in February, don’t forget to water your garden. This heat is confusing it, too.

Do you believe Phil and think we’ve got six more weeks of winter?

By: Lisa Kaplan Gordon
Published: February 2, 2012

Lynda Collins Welles Bowen Realtors

Lynda Collins, Realtor

Lynda Collins, Realtor
Office: 419-535-0011
Fax: 419 535-7571
VM: 419-539-2700 ext. 189
lcollins@realtyagent.com

You can find Lynda’s website by clicking here.

Tips for buying a house The top 10 things you need to know when buying a home.

Sell Your Home TipsWe found this great article on money.cnn.com about Buying a House, Money 101.Here is just a small portion of it, if you like it click the link at the end to read more.

From CNN Website-
1. Don’t buy if you can’t stay put.

If you can’t commit to remaining in one place for at least a few years, then owning is probably not for you, at least not yet. With the transaction costs of buying and selling a home, you may end up losing money if you sell any sooner – even in a rising market. When prices are falling, it’s an even worse proposition.

2. Start by shoring up your credit.

Since you most likely will need to get a mortgage to buy a house, you must make sure your credit history is as clean as possible. A few months before you start house hunting, get copies of your credit report. Make sure the facts are correct, and fix any problems you discover.

3. Aim for a home you can really afford.

The rule of thumb is that you can buy housing that runs about two-and-one-half times your annual salary. But you’ll do better to use one of many calculators available online to get a better handle on how your income, debts, and expenses affect what you can afford.

To Read More Click Here.

Ginny Meeker Presents Low Cost Kitchen Makeover Idea

Low-Cost Kitchen Makeover Inspiration from Rachael Ray

Article From HouseLogic.com

By: Lisa Kaplan Gordon
Published: December 06, 2011

A $30 roll of faux stainless steel foil can give your kitchen the lift it needs to sparkle during the holidays.

Don’t panic if your kitchen isn’t holiday ready. We’ve found a video that will help you spruce up your kitchen (http://www.houselogic.com/home-improvement/rooms/kitchens/) without spending your Christmas club money.

Talk show host Rachael Ray watches as her test kitchen gets an instant and under $100 makeover with the help of peel-and-stick faux-surface sheets, which make old appliances look like shiny, new stainless steel appliances, and old laminate kitchen countertops (http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/kitchens/laminate-kitchen-countertops-perfect-fakes-low-cost/) dead ringers for granite.

On camera, you can’t tell the difference.

Ginny Meeker, Realtor

Ginny Meeker, Realtor

Office: 419-535-0011
Cell: 419-350-3805
Fax: 419 535-7571
VM: 419-539-2700 ext. 103
ginnymeeker@wellesbowen.com

You can find Ginny’s website by clicking here.